Nature at her Best

I’ve posted several landscapes from my recent fly fishing and photo trip to Montana but none of the fish.  So just to prove to all of you that follow my blog, I do fish and occasionally catch them.  This beauty was caught on a fly, played gently, and carefully released as are all the fish I catch.

Smith River
Smith River

What Was It?

Was it a Rabbit?, Death Valley CA  (1 of 1)

I returned last night from three days in the US’s largest National Park not in Alaska.  Death Valley’s 5269 square miles has to be seen in order to understand and appreciate how large, stark, and beautiful it is.  I’m going to post a photo a day for the rest of this week to, in a small way, show you what I saw.  Some are grand and some simple like this one.

There are a series of dunes named Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes that hundreds of people a day visit so by nightfall their foot prints are everywhere.  The good news is the wind often blows hard at night and erases them.  If you hike out a couple of miles at first light you can see where small animals have traveled.  You can also capture those dramatic scene too.  Those are for later.

Montana Horse

Montana Horse

If you follow this blog you may know I like to try B&W film occasionally.  It’s much harder than I thought it would be.  Colors can’t bail you out and the subject has to really be strong.  At least to me it does.  I haven’t shot many animals but having recently been in Montana there were lots of horses and here’s one I liked.  Developed and scanned.  No post processing at all.

Big Horns

Zion National Park is a photographers paradise.  I took hundreds of photos but don’t want to overwhelm this blog with all of them at one time.  However, while hiking one morning I didn’t expect to see these Big Horn Sheep.  They were curious, a bit edgy but didn’t run off.  The Canon with zoom would have been nice to have.  This was taken with a 35MM so there is a significant crop.

Pelican (Pelecaniformes)

There are numerous sea birds to watch and photograph here on the coast of California.  Normally a zoom with auto focus and the servo mode would be the best choice.  However, considering the theme of this blog, a 5D Mark II and 200MM wouldn’t be appropriate.  So one has to be patient, zone focus, and be quick when using a 35MM manual lens to get birds in flight.  Occasionally it works out like this morning at Shell Beach.