Ubehebe Crater

Death Valley National Part.
Death Valley National Park

Ubehebe Crater is located at the north tip of the Cottonwood Mountains. The crater is half a mile (one kilometer) wide and 500 to 777 feet (150 to 237 m) deep. The age of the crater is estimated from 2,000 to 7,000 years old.”Ubehebe” (pronounced YOU-bee-HEE-bee) is a Timbisha Native American word meaning “Big basket in the rock.”

Mesquite Sand Dunes

Death Valley National Park
Death Valley National Park
Death Valley National Park

Death Valley’s Mesquite Sand Dunes is 2 miles south of Stovepipe Wells Village.  There is a parking lot but you have to hike 2 miles or more to get out to the largest dunes.  I found that if you park 1/4 of a mile north of the lot and off the side of the road you can hike to dunes that the tourists don’t get to.  The importance of that, for a photograph, is there are no foot prints to spoil the pristine nature of dunes.  I took photos at sunset and sunrise and this one was at sunset.

What Was It?

Was it a Rabbit?, Death Valley CA  (1 of 1)

I returned last night from three days in the US’s largest National Park not in Alaska.  Death Valley’s 5269 square miles has to be seen in order to understand and appreciate how large, stark, and beautiful it is.  I’m going to post a photo a day for the rest of this week to, in a small way, show you what I saw.  Some are grand and some simple like this one.

There are a series of dunes named Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes that hundreds of people a day visit so by nightfall their foot prints are everywhere.  The good news is the wind often blows hard at night and erases them.  If you hike out a couple of miles at first light you can see where small animals have traveled.  You can also capture those dramatic scene too.  Those are for later.